Vegetable Quiche

Quiche is traditionally made with eggs, cheese, cream, and lots of salt, but since I avoid these ingredients, you won’t find any of them in this recipe. But—this crustless quiche is packed full of delicious vegetables, herbs and spices, and has a great flavor! Ideal for a special occasion breakfast, lunch or dinner. I recommend...

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Reversing India’s Diabetes Problem: A Q&A with Dr. Nandita Shah

India is known as a country of vegetarians, but, in reality, more and more Indians are eating meat, especially young people drawn in by fast food chains. Dairy foods like... Read more

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New Book. New Year. New You.

PBN

As we wrap up 2017 (wow, how did that happen?), I’m excited to announce a new book that went on presale this week. I will never forget those months seven years ago working on the first edition, waking up at 4 am to write before my two small toddlers took over the day. Fast forward to last summer and my agent called to ask if I might be interested in updating Plant-Based Nutrition (Idiot’s Guide) and I immediately responded with an enthusiastic, YES! So much has changed in the world of plant-based diet and nutrition since the first edition in the book. And for me, the last year has been somewhat of a personal renaissance. 

My journey to a plant-based diet was wrought with limited information, unintentional sabotage by friends and family, and wider social pressures. Many of you have experienced some or all of these, but today, nearly 30 years after my journey began, we now have unimaginable resources to help our plant-based journey move swiftly and effortlessly. In early 2017 we published a paper in the Journal of Geriatric Cardiology on plant-based nutrition and it afforded me the opportunity to review the literature for advances in plant-based nutrition. I added a co-author to that paper, former NASA Scientist and metabolic guru, Ray Cronise. He’s the guy behind Magician, Penn Jillette’s amazing 100-lb. weight loss and plant-based diet transformation. He’s been working at the intersection of plant-based diet and healthspan/longevity research and brings an entirely new perspective to the table. 

Together we not only co-authored that paper, but I also asked him to join me on the revised edition of Plant-Based Nutrition (Idiot’s Guide). He’s gone back two centuries, to the very beginning of metabolism and nutrition and collected some of the most historically significant textbooks and articles. We have done experiments with food and metabolism and I even lost 12 lbs and achieved and maintained a weight I’ve never reached in my adult life this past year with this exciting information.  

PBNOur work overlaps perfectly and we have included that in this new edition of Plant-Based Nutrition. We have an entirely new way to organize food called the Food Triangle, which eliminates the popular, but contradictory, macronutrient-centered scheme of protein, carbs, and fat (we named it macroconfusion). There is information on the metabolic consequences of oxidative priority, which explains why we tend to gain weight eating certain foods. We use these tools to examine how a plant-based diet can promote healthspan through it’s mimicking of very successful dietary restriction without malnutrition research. We believe that a whole food, plant-based diet of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, herbs, and spices is the most enjoyable and easiest step you can take to not just live longer, but to LIVE longer. 

Of course you’ll also find updated material from the first edition that covers nutrition information across the lifespan from pregnancy to athletes to seniors. We have new recipes from plant-based celebrity chefs such as Matthew Kenney, Dreena Burton, Jazzy Vegetarian, Kathy Patalsky, Robin Robertson, Fran Costigan, Jason Wyrick, and Matt Frazier. It’s a great getting started guide for plant-curious friends and family and its lessons are all centered on the solid scientific evidence we lay out in our journal article. Presales will continue through the official publication date of January 9th, 2018. 

Thank you for your continued support. I am so excited about the upcoming year and the explosion of plant-based nutrition information. 

The post New Book. New Year. New You. appeared first on Plant Based Dietitian.

Original Link

New Book. New Year. New You.

PBN

As we wrap up 2017 (wow, how did that happen?), I’m excited to announce a new book that went on presale this week. I will never forget those months seven years ago working on the first edition, waking up at 4 am to write before my two small toddlers took over the day. Fast forward to last summer and my agent called to ask if I might be interested in updating Plant-Based Nutrition (Idiot’s Guide) and I immediately responded with an enthusiastic, YES! So much has changed in the world of plant-based diet and nutrition since the first edition in the book. And for me, the last year has been somewhat of a personal renaissance. 

My journey to a plant-based diet was wrought with limited information, unintentional sabotage by friends and family, and wider social pressures. Many of you have experienced some or all of these, but today, nearly 30 years after my journey began, we now have unimaginable resources to help our plant-based journey move swiftly and effortlessly. In early 2017 we published a paper in the Journal of Geriatric Cardiology on plant-based nutrition and it afforded me the opportunity to review the literature for advances in plant-based nutrition. I added a co-author to that paper, former NASA Scientist and metabolic guru, Ray Cronise. He’s the guy behind Magician, Penn Jillette’s amazing 100-lb. weight loss and plant-based diet transformation. He’s been working at the intersection of plant-based diet and healthspan/longevity research and brings an entirely new perspective to the table. 

Together we not only co-authored that paper, but I also asked him to join me on the revised edition of Plant-Based Nutrition (Idiot’s Guide). He’s gone back two centuries, to the very beginning of metabolism and nutrition and collected some of the most historically significant textbooks and articles. We have done experiments with food and metabolism and I even lost 12 lbs and achieved and maintained a weight I’ve never reached in my adult life this past year with this exciting information.  

PBNOur work overlaps perfectly and we have included that in this new edition of Plant-Based Nutrition. We have an entirely new way to organize food called the Food Triangle, which eliminates the popular, but contradictory, macronutrient-centered scheme of protein, carbs, and fat (we named it macroconfusion). There is information on the metabolic consequences of oxidative priority, which explains why we tend to gain weight eating certain foods. We use these tools to examine how a plant-based diet can promote healthspan through it’s mimicking of very successful dietary restriction without malnutrition research. We believe that a whole food, plant-based diet of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, herbs, and spices is the most enjoyable and easiest step you can take to not just live longer, but to LIVE longer. 

Of course you’ll also find updated material from the first edition that covers nutrition information across the lifespan from pregnancy to athletes to seniors. We have new recipes from plant-based celebrity chefs such as Matthew Kenney, Dreena Burton, Jazzy Vegetarian, Kathy Patalsky, Robin Robertson, Fran Costigan, Jason Wyrick, and Matt Frazier. It’s a great getting started guide for plant-curious friends and family and its lessons are all centered on the solid scientific evidence we lay out in our journal article. Presales will continue through the official publication date of January 9th, 2018. 

Thank you for your continued support. I am so excited about the upcoming year and the explosion of plant-based nutrition information. 

The post New Book. New Year. New You. appeared first on Plant Based Dietitian.

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Pumpkin-Walnut Cornbread

This twist on traditional cornbread is perfect for the holiday table, a healthy departure from nutrient-poor, white-flour breads and rolls. Lightly sweetened with dates, this bread is a great complement to soups and stews, potato dishes and salads. Print Pumpkin-Walnut Cornbread Prep time:  20 mins Cook time:  38 mins Total time:  58 mins Serves: 9  ...

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Heart of Gold: Turmeric vs. Exercise

Sept 5 Heart of Gold copy.jpeg

The endothelium is the inner lining of our blood vessels. Laid end-to-end, endothelial cells from a single human would wrap more than four times around the world. And it's not just an inert layer; it's highly metabolically active. I've talked before about how sensitive our endothelium is to oxidation (The Power of NO) and inflammation (The Leaky Gut Theory). If we don't take care of it, endothelial dysfunction may set us up for heart disease or a stroke. Are we ready to heed our endothelium's early warning signal?

If it's all about oxidation and inflammation, then fruits and vegetables should help. And indeed it appears they do. Each daily serving of fruits or vegetables was associated with a 6% improvement in endothelial function. These fruit- and vegetable-associated improvements in endothelial function are in contrast to several negative vitamin C pill studies that failed to show a benefit. It can be concluded that the positive findings of the fruit and vegetable study are not just because of any one nutrient in fruits and veggies. Rather than searching for the single magic bullet micronutrient, a more practical approach is likely to consider whole foods. Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption is likely to have numerous benefits due to synergistic effects of the plethora of wonderful nutrients in plants.

Exercise helps our endothelial cells, too, but what type of exercise helps best? Patients were randomized into four groups: aerobic exercise (cycling for an hour a day), resistance training (using weights and elastic bands), both, or neither. The aerobic group kicked butt. The resistance group kicked butt. The aerobic and resistance group kicked butt, too. The only group who didn't kick butt was the group who sat on their butts. Our endothelium doesn't care if we're on a bike or lifting weights, as long as we're getting physical activity regularly. If we stop exercising, our endothelial function plummets.

Antioxidant pills don't help, but drug companies aren't going to give up that easy. They're currently looking into anti-inflammatory pills. After all, there's only so much you can make selling salad. For those who prefer plants to pills, one of the most anti-inflammatory foods is the spice turmeric. Researchers in Japan recently compared the endothelial benefits of exercise to that of curcumin, the yellow pigment in turmeric and curry powder. About a teaspoon a day's worth of turmeric for eight weeks was compared to 30 to 60 minutes of aerobic exercise a day.

Which group improved their endothelial function more? The group who did neither experienced no benefit, but both the exercise and the curcumin groups significantly boosted endothelial function. The researchers reported: "The magnitude of the improvement achieved by curcumin treatment was comparable to that obtained with exercise. Therefore, regular ingestion of curcumin could be a preventive measure against cardiovascular disease" at least in postmenopausal women, who were the subjects of this study. "Furthermore, [their] results suggest that curcumin may be a potential alternative treatment for patients who are unable to exercise."

Ideally, we'd both eat curcumin and exercise. One study looked at central arterial hemodynamics. Basically, if our endothelium is impaired, our arteries stiffen, making it harder for our heart to pump. Compared to placebo, we can drop down the pressure with turmeric curcumin or exercise. However, if we combine both, then we really start rocking and rolling, as you can see in the chart about 4 minutes into my video Heart of Gold: Turmeric vs. Exercise. The researchers conclude that these findings suggest that regular endurance exercise combined with daily curcumin ingestion may reduce the pressure against which our hearts have to figh. We want both healthy eating and exertion for our endothelium.


This entry is a follow-up to Turmeric Curcumin vs. Exercise for Artery Function.

Endothelial dysfunction is at the heart (pun intended) of many of our deadliest diseases. Pledge to save your endothelial cells and check out some of these other videos about the effects of food on our endothelial function:

For more on the concept of nutrient synergy, see Garden Variety Anti-Inflammation and Cranberries vs. Cancer.

Regardless what you do or don't eat, exercise is critical:

I must have dozens of turmeric videos by now, but here are a few to get you started:

In health,

Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven't yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations:

Original Link

Heart of Gold: Turmeric vs. Exercise

Sept 5 Heart of Gold copy.jpeg

The endothelium is the inner lining of our blood vessels. Laid end-to-end, endothelial cells from a single human would wrap more than four times around the world. And it's not just an inert layer; it's highly metabolically active. I've talked before about how sensitive our endothelium is to oxidation (The Power of NO) and inflammation (The Leaky Gut Theory). If we don't take care of it, endothelial dysfunction may set us up for heart disease or a stroke. Are we ready to heed our endothelium's early warning signal?

If it's all about oxidation and inflammation, then fruits and vegetables should help. And indeed it appears they do. Each daily serving of fruits or vegetables was associated with a 6% improvement in endothelial function. These fruit- and vegetable-associated improvements in endothelial function are in contrast to several negative vitamin C pill studies that failed to show a benefit. It can be concluded that the positive findings of the fruit and vegetable study are not just because of any one nutrient in fruits and veggies. Rather than searching for the single magic bullet micronutrient, a more practical approach is likely to consider whole foods. Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption is likely to have numerous benefits due to synergistic effects of the plethora of wonderful nutrients in plants.

Exercise helps our endothelial cells, too, but what type of exercise helps best? Patients were randomized into four groups: aerobic exercise (cycling for an hour a day), resistance training (using weights and elastic bands), both, or neither. The aerobic group kicked butt. The resistance group kicked butt. The aerobic and resistance group kicked butt, too. The only group who didn't kick butt was the group who sat on their butts. Our endothelium doesn't care if we're on a bike or lifting weights, as long as we're getting physical activity regularly. If we stop exercising, our endothelial function plummets.

Antioxidant pills don't help, but drug companies aren't going to give up that easy. They're currently looking into anti-inflammatory pills. After all, there's only so much you can make selling salad. For those who prefer plants to pills, one of the most anti-inflammatory foods is the spice turmeric. Researchers in Japan recently compared the endothelial benefits of exercise to that of curcumin, the yellow pigment in turmeric and curry powder. About a teaspoon a day's worth of turmeric for eight weeks was compared to 30 to 60 minutes of aerobic exercise a day.

Which group improved their endothelial function more? The group who did neither experienced no benefit, but both the exercise and the curcumin groups significantly boosted endothelial function. The researchers reported: "The magnitude of the improvement achieved by curcumin treatment was comparable to that obtained with exercise. Therefore, regular ingestion of curcumin could be a preventive measure against cardiovascular disease" at least in postmenopausal women, who were the subjects of this study. "Furthermore, [their] results suggest that curcumin may be a potential alternative treatment for patients who are unable to exercise."

Ideally, we'd both eat curcumin and exercise. One study looked at central arterial hemodynamics. Basically, if our endothelium is impaired, our arteries stiffen, making it harder for our heart to pump. Compared to placebo, we can drop down the pressure with turmeric curcumin or exercise. However, if we combine both, then we really start rocking and rolling, as you can see in the chart about 4 minutes into my video Heart of Gold: Turmeric vs. Exercise. The researchers conclude that these findings suggest that regular endurance exercise combined with daily curcumin ingestion may reduce the pressure against which our hearts have to figh. We want both healthy eating and exertion for our endothelium.


This entry is a follow-up to Turmeric Curcumin vs. Exercise for Artery Function.

Endothelial dysfunction is at the heart (pun intended) of many of our deadliest diseases. Pledge to save your endothelial cells and check out some of these other videos about the effects of food on our endothelial function:

For more on the concept of nutrient synergy, see Garden Variety Anti-Inflammation and Cranberries vs. Cancer.

Regardless what you do or don't eat, exercise is critical:

I must have dozens of turmeric videos by now, but here are a few to get you started:

In health,

Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven't yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations:

Original Link

Vitamin B12 Recommendations

Vitamin B12 Recommendations on a Plant-Based Diet

A plant-based diet has been shown time and time again to be the most health-promoting, disease-fighting, and nutrient-dense way of eating possible. Emphasizing a wide range of vegetables (especially leafy green varieties), fruits, whole grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, herbs, and spices makes it simple to achieve nutrient needs while avoiding chronic overnutrition. Guides such as the Plant-Based Food Guide Pyramid and Plate, 6 Daily 3’s, and Notable Nutrient Chart help with the high level view of what exactly a day-in-the-plant-based-life may look like. As does this post of Everything You Need to Know About A Plant-Based Diet in Less Than 500 Words and Sample Meal Plans Made Simple + Hundreds of Recipes.

One nutrient that likely will fall short on a plant-based diet is cobalamin, commonly referred to as vitamin B12. B12 is produced by microorganisms, bacteria, fungi, and algae, but not by animals or plants. B12 is found in animal products because they concentrate the nutrient after ingesting these microorganisms along with their food in their flesh, organs, and byproducts (e.g. eggs and dairy). Also, ruminant animals (such as cows, sheep, and goats) have bacteria in their rumen that produce vitamin B12.

In a vegan diet, vitamin B12 may be found in fortified plant milks, cereals, and other foods, such as nutritional yeast. However, if vegans are not conscientious about taking in the recommended dietary allowance (RDA), there could be harmful health consequences. Deficiency can result in potentially irreversible neurological disorders, gastrointestinal problems, and megaloblastic anemia. B12 deficiency is not unique to vegans who do not supplement. Deficiency is also a concern with aging, medication use, and gastrointestinal issues. So much so that it has been recommended that all adults over the age of 60 years supplement to avoid deficiency.

Interestingly, the body is able to store B12 for upwards of even ten years. To further complicate this, signs and symptoms for deficiency are either not noticeable or simply very subtle. So, if B12 is not being taken in at adequate levels or if there are absorption problems, deficiency will eventually ensue. Because blood tests for B12 levels can be skewed by other variables, irreversible damage may occur before a deficiency is detected.

RDA’s for vitamin B12 across the lifespan can be found in detail here. For non-pregnant adults, aged 14 and above, the RDA is 2.4 micrograms per day. To ensure this is absorbed (in a healthy individual, barring any possible inhibitors), higher doses are recommended.

B12

 

The bottom line is that it seems the best way to supplement to maximize absorption and maintain optimal blood levels of B12 is for vegan adults (as well as non-vegan adults over the age of 60) should consider supplementing with these doses of vitamin B12:

  • 50 µg twice a day OR
  • 150 µg once a day OR
  • 2,500 µg once a week

High doses of B12 are safe and there isn’t a tolerable upper limit that has been established. It is best to undergo testing regularly and adjust the dose as necessary.

 

The post Vitamin B12 Recommendations appeared first on Plant Based Dietitian.

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How I Answer 6 Common Questions as the Parent of a Vegan Toddler

As a now-seasoned vegan and public health advocate, I consider myself an expert at “Vegan 20 Questions: Eating Out With Omnivores.” If you’ve ever gone rogue from the standard American diet (SAD), chances are that you too have encountered questions... Read more

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Can Houses of Worship Commit to Going Plant-Based?

It is not a stretch of the imagination to say that the Western palate is accustomed to meat as one of the primary means of community interaction. Think about all of the celebrations, life-cycle events, and solemn occasions that have... Read more

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