Lasagna

This is very reminiscent of traditional lasagnas, but of course, without the meat, cheese, and added salt and oil. Bottom line: it’s delicious! Instead of meat, I have used zucchini and mushrooms, and a great tofu blend to take the place of the ricotta. Lasagnas are a labor of love, for sure. But they are worth...

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Clamless Chowder

This soup is reminiscent of New England clam chowder: it’s thick, creamy, and full of potatoes, as well as onion, celery, bay leaves, and thyme. Chopped oyster mushrooms provide a great clam-like texture. A few cashews blended in add richness instead of cream and butter, and if you want a seafood flavor, simply add some...

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Baked Falafel with Tzatziki Sauce

Traditionally, falafel balls are deep-fried, but for this recipe they are pressed into patties and baked; a much healthier option. Falafel is a Middle Eastern dish whose signature ingredient is ground chickpeas. This makes 8 patties, but double the recipe for larger families or if you want to freeze some. Print Baked Falafel Prep time:  25 mins...

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Which Nut Suppresses Cancer Cell Growth the Most?

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People who eat nuts in their adolescence may have a better chance of fighting off breast cancer later in life, according to data from the Harvard Nurse's Study. A follow-up study involving the daughters of the nurses corroborated the findings. Those eating more peanut butter, nuts, beans, lentils, soybeans, or corn were found to have just a fraction of the risk for fibrocystic breast disease, which places one at higher risk of cancer. The protective effects were found to be strongest for those most at risk, such as those with a family history of breast cancer.

Another study out of the British Journal of Cancer found that even two handfuls of nuts a week may protect against pancreatic cancer, one of our most fatal malignancies.

Nuts are described as "nutritionally precious," which may explain some of the mechanisms by which nut components induce cancer cell death and inhibit cancer growth and spread in vitro. But which nuts work the best? In my video #1 Anticancer Vegetable, we learned that two classes of vegetables--the broccoli family vegetables and the garlic family vegetables--most effectively suppressed breast cancer cell growth. In Which Fruit Fights Cancer Better?, cranberries and lemons took the title.

What about nuts? In terms of antioxidant content, walnuts and pecans steal the show. Twenty-five walnuts have the antioxidant equivalent of eight grams of vitamin C (the vitamin C found in a hundred oranges).

But how do they do against cancer? In the video, Which Nut Fights Cancer Better?, you can see a graph of human cancer cell proliferation versus increasing concentrations of the ten most common nuts eaten in the United States. If you drip water on these cancer cells as a control, nothing happens. Hazelnuts, pistachios and Brazil nuts don't do much better. Pine nuts, cashews and macadamias start pulling away from the pack. Almonds appear twice as protective, halving cancer cell growth at only half the dose as pine nuts, cashews, and macadamias. Walnuts, pecans, and peanuts come out as the clear winners, causing a dramatic drop in cancer proliferation at just tiny doses.

More nuttiness:

-Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven't yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live year-in-review presentations Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death, More Than an Apple a Day, From Table to Able, and Food as Medicine.

Image Credit: Mariya Chorna / Flickr

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Mushroom Risotto

Even without the addition of traditional oil, butter, cheese, and salt, risotto can be very satisfying and delicious. This classic Italian rice dish is creamy and hearty, getting its big flavor from a variety of mushrooms, as well as shallots, garlic, balsamic vinegar, and fresh tarragon. Print Mushroom Risotto Prep time:  20 mins Cook time:  45 mins Total...

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Nuts May Extend Your Lifespan By About 2 years

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We've known that increased nut consumption has been associated with a reduced risk of major chronic diseases, such as heart disease and diabetes. But do those who eat nuts actually live longer lives? Clinical trials have shown nuts help lower cholesterol and oxidation, and improve our arterial function and blood sugar levels. Does all this translate into greater longevity?

Researchers at Harvard examined the association between nut consumption and subsequent mortality of over 100,000 people followed for decades. In that time, tens of thousands died, but those that ate nuts every day lived significantly longer. Daily nut consumers had fewer deaths from cancer, heart disease, and respiratory disease, even after controlling for other lifestyle factors. Nut consumers lived significantly longer whether they were older or younger, fat or skinny, whether they exercised more, smoked, drank, or ate other foods that may affect mortality.

But nuts are so filled with fat that there "may be a concern that frequent nut consumption can result in weight gain." However, that's not what the Harvard researchers found. In fact, other studies have associated nut consumption with a slimmer waist, less weight gain, and lower risk of obesity. If we look at all the studies put together, it's pretty much a wash. Diets enriched with nuts do not seem to affect body weight, body mass index, or waist circumference much at all. For example, one of the most recent such studies, highlighted in my video, Nuts May Help Prevent Death, in which subjects were told to add either 0, 70, or 120 pistachios to their daily diet as an afternoon snack every day for three months, found no noticeable difference between the three groups. You couldn't see any difference between those eating no nuts and those eating more than 100 a day. Hence, it appears that the incorporation of nuts (around one to two small handfuls a day) would be advisable to ensure various health benefits without the risk of body weight gain.

How nuts do we have to go? Not much. Just a few servings a week may boost our lifespan and lower cancer rates--but it appears we have to keep it up. In the PREDIMED study, when long-time nut eaters were told to cut down on eating nuts or choose extra virgin olive oil, within five years they apparently lost much of their longevity benefit. Only the group that started out eating nuts and continued to eat at least the same amount of nuts died significantly less often.

You can find more on nuts and heart disease in my videos Nuts and Bolts of Cholesterol Lowering and How Do Nuts Prevent Sudden Cardiac Death?

More on nuts and cancer in Tree Nuts or Peanuts for Breast Cancer Prevention?

Nuts and inflammatory disease: Fighting Inflammation in a Nut Shell.

More than you ever wanted to know about nuts and weight here: Nuts and Obesity: The Weight of Evidence.

What if your physician tells you to not eat nuts because you have diverticulosis? Share this video with them: Diverticulosis & Nuts.

Those 100 pistachios a day may have one side-effect, though: Pistachio Nuts for Erectile Dysfunction.

-Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven't yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live year-in-review presentations Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death, More Than an Apple a Day, and From Table to Able.

Image Credit: Aoife mac / Flickr

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Tu-no Casserole

This hearty casserole calls for garbanzo beans instead of tuna, and mushrooms instead of the traditional can of salt-heavy Cream of Mushroom Soup (has over 1,000mg sodium per can). Perfect for “comfort food” night. No-nut option as well. Ingredients Sauce: 2½ cups unsweetened, non-dairy milk ½ cup unsalted cashews (2 oz.) 1 teaspoon granulated onion […]

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Creamy Mushroom Gravy

This gravy is delicious with mashed potatoes or Lentil & Rice Loaf. It’s rich and flavorful even without the typical processed ingredients found in vegan gravies, such as soy sauce, non-dairy butter, flour, and cornstarch. Ingredients 2 cups water ¼ cup raw unsalted cashews (1½ ounces) 6 medium white or brown (cremini) mushrooms (6 ounces) […]

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Curried Sweet Potato Salad

If traditional Potato Salad was in a midlife crisis and its therapist asked, “What would you be if you could be anything in the world,” it might say “Curried Sweet Potato Salad!” It’s distinctive, daring, and delectable, not to mention, attractive! Ingredients Dressing: 1/2 cup raw, unsalted cashews (2 ounces) 1/2 cup water 1/4 cup […]

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Creamy Coleslaw

There are countless variations of this popular side dish; my recipe is inspired by my mom’s, which includes apples and raisins. I use a cashew-based dressing instead of oily vegan mayo, but you can easily forego the cashews for a lighter dressing. Dressing Ingredients ½ cup water ⅓ cup raw, unsalted cashews (about 2 ounces) […]

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