Rice Salad with Asparagus & Shiitake Mushrooms

I call this a salad but it could also be a side dish. The bottom line is that it is de-lic-ious! Made of brown rice, asparagus, shiitake mushrooms, green peas, green onions, pecans, and one of my favorite fresh herbs, tarragon. Great texture and flavor, with a light dressing of lemon juice, mustard and garlic....

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The post Rice Salad with Asparagus & Shiitake Mushrooms appeared first on Straight Up Food.

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Why Smoothies are Better Than Juicing

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Studies such as a recent Harvard School of Public Health investigation found that the consumption of whole fruits is associated with a significantly lower risk of type 2 diabetes, whereas fruit juice consumption is associated with a higher risk, highlighting the dramatic difference between eating whole fruits and drinking fruit juice. Cholesterol serves as another example. If we eat apples, our cholesterol drops. On the other hand, if we drink apple juice, our cholesterol may actually go up a little. Leaving just a little of the fiber behind--as in cloudy apple juice--was found to add back in some of the benefit.

We used to think of fiber as just a bulking agent that helps with bowel regularity. We now know fiber is digestible by our gut bacteria, which make short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) out of it. SCFAs have a number of health promoting effects, such as inhibiting the growth of bad bacteria and increasing mineral absorption. For example, experimentally infused into the rectum of the human body, SCFAs can stimulate calcium absorption, so much so that we can improve the bone mineral density of teenagers just by giving them the fiber naturally found in foods like onions, asparagus, and bananas.

Our good bacteria also uses fiber to maintain normal bowel structure and function, preventing or alleviating diarrhea, stimulating colonic blood flow up to five-fold, and increasing fluid and electrolyte uptake. The major fuel for the cells that line our colon is butyrate, which our good bacteria make from fiber. We feed them, and they feed us right back.

If the only difference between fruit and fruit juice is fiber, why can't the juice industry just add some fiber back to the juice? The reason is because we remove a lot more than fiber when we juice fruits and vegetables. We also lose all the nutrients that are bound to the fiber.

In the 1980's, a study (highlighted in my video, Juicing Removes More Than Just Fiber) found a discrepancy in the amount of fiber in carob using two different methods. A gap of 21.5 percent was identified not as fiber but as nonextractable polyphenols, a class of phytonutrients thought to have an array of health-promoting effects. Some of the effects associated with the intake of dietary fiber in plants may actually be due to the presence of these polyphenols.

Nonextractable polyphenols, usually ignored, are the major part of dietary polyphenols. Most polyphenol phytonutrients in plants are stuck to the fiber. These so-called missing polyphenols make it down to our colon, are liberated by our friendly flora and can then get absorbed into our system. The phytonutrients in fruit and vegetable juice may just be the tip of the iceberg.

For those that like drinking their fruits and vegetables, these findings suggest that smoothies may be preferable. I can imagine people who eat really healthy thinking they get so much fiber from their regular diet that they need not concern themselves with the loss from juicing. But we may be losing more than we think.

For those that like drinking their fruits and vegetables, this suggests smoothies are preferable. I can imagine people who eat really healthy thinking they get so much fiber from their regular diet that they need not concern themselves with the loss from juicing, but they may be losing more than they think.

Why are polyphenol phytonutrients important? See, for example, my video How to Slow Brain Aging by Two Years

Not that fiber isn't important in its own right. Check out:

For more on smoothies, check out:

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven't yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live year-in-review presentations Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death, More Than an Apple a Day, From Table to Able, and Food as Medicine.

Image Credit: Craig Sunter / Flickr

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Bile Binding Beets

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In my video Breast Cancer and Constipation, I discussed how fruits and veggies bind carcinogenic bile acids in our gut. Since bile acids are absorbed back into our systems, they may increase our risk of not only colon cancer but also other cancers as well. In light of this, researchers publishing in the journal, Nutrition Research, concluded that to "lower the risk of diet and lifestyle-related premature degenerative diseases and to advance human nutrition research, relative bile acid-binding potential of foods and fractions need to be evaluated."

They found that some vegetables bind bile acids better than others. We know that those eating more plant-based diets are at a lower risk of heart disease and cancer. This could partly be because of phytonutrients in plants that act as antioxidants and potent stimulators of natural detoxifying enzymes in our bodies. Veggies can also lower cholesterol and detoxify harmful metabolites, functions that can be predicted by their ability to bind bile acids.

A group of USDA researchers studying this topic discovered three important things. First, they found an over five-fold variability in bile acid binding among various vegetables that had similar fiber content, suggesting that bile acid binding is not just related to total dietary fiber content (as previously thought), but instead some combination of unique phytonutrients yet to be determined.

Second, they discovered that steaming significantly improves the bile acid binding of collards, kale, mustard greens, broccoli, peppers, cabbage, beets, eggplant, asparagus, carrots, green beans, and cauliflower, suggesting that in this way steaming vegetables may be more healthful than those consumed raw.

Finally, they ranked multiple vegetables for bile binding ability. Which vegetables kicked the most bile butt? (in my video, Which Vegetable Binds Bile Best?, you can see a visual comparison of bile binding ability.) Turnips turned up last. Then came cabbage, cauliflower, bell peppers, spinach, asparagus and green beans. Mustard greens and broccoli were better. Eggplant, carrots and Brussels sprouts basically tie for the #5 slot. Then collards at #4. Kale got the bronze, okra the silver, and beets the gold. Kale, surprisingly, got beet.

The researchers concluded that inclusion of all these vegetables in our daily diets should be encouraged. When consumed regularly, they concluded, these vegetables may lower the risk of premature degenerative diseases and improve public health.

More raw versus cooked comparisons in

Beets also have a number of other remarkable properties. Check out my video series on Doping with Beet Juice as well as Hearts Shouldn't Skip a Beet, and Whole Beets vs. Juice for Improving Athletic Performance.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven't yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live year-in-review presentations Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death, More Than an Apple a Day, From Table to Able, and Food as Medicine.

Image Credit: Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr

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How to Treat Gout With Diet

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The Washington State Fruit Commission, our largest cherry producer, can fund reviews that cherry-pick studies on the anti-inflammatory effects of cherries in a petri dish and animal models. But what we've needed are human studies. For example, if we stuff the human equivalent of up to a thousand cups of cherries down the throats of rats, it appears to have an anti-inflammatory effect, but we could never eat that many. (In fact, if we tried, it could end badly. One poor guy who ate 500 cherries whole--without spitting out the pits--ended up fatally obstructing his colon.)

A decade ago, we didn't have many human studies, but thankfully now we do. A study published in The Journal of Nutrition had men and women eat about 45 cherries a day for a month (I wouldn't mind being part of that study!). The researchers found a 25% drop in C-reactive protein levels (a marker of inflammation), as well as an inflammatory protein with an inelegant acronym RANTES ("Regulated on, Activation, Normal, T cell, Expressed and, Secreted"). Even a month after the study ended there appeared to be residual anti-inflammatory benefit from the cherry fest.

These subjects were all healthy, with low levels of inflammation to begin with, but a follow-up study, highlighted in my video, Gout Treatment with a Cherry on Top, on folks with higher levels found similar results for C-reactive protein and for a number of other markers for chronic inflammatory diseases. Do cherries then help people who actually have a chronic inflammatory disease?

Back in 1950, in an obscure Texas medical journal, "observations made by responsible physicians" suggested that in a dozen patients with gout, eating half a pound of fresh or canned cherries helped prevent flares of gout. But the issue had never seriously been tested, until recently. Gout is an excruciatingly painful inflammatory arthritis caused by the crystallization of uric acid within joints. Based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2008, the prevalence of gout in the US is estimated to be 3.9% among US adults, which translates into 8.3 million people.

Hundreds of gout sufferers were studied, and cherry intake was associated with a 35% lower risk of gout attacks, with over half the risk gone at three servings measured over a two day period (about 16 cherries a day). That's the kind of efficacy the researchers saw with a low-purine diet (uric acid is a break-down product of purines). This same research group found that purine intake of animal origin increased the odds for recurrent gout attacks by nearly five-fold. Heavy alcohol consumption isn't a good idea either.

There are some high-purine non-animal foods, like mushrooms and asparagus, but they found no significant link to plant sources of purines. So the researchers recommended eliminating meat and seafood from the diet. This may decrease risk substantially, and adding cherries on top may decrease risk of gout attacks even further. Same thing with the leading drug: allopurinol works, but adding produce appears to work even better.

Often, dietary changes and cherries may be all patients have, as doctors are hesitant to prescribe uric acid-lowering drugs like allopurinol due to rare but serious side-effects.

In addition to fighting inflammation, cherries may also lower uric acid levels. Within five hours of eating a big bowl of cherries, uric acid levels in the blood significantly drop. At the same time, antioxidant levels in the blood go up. So is it just an antioxidant effect? Would other fruit work just as well? No. Researchers tried grapes, strawberries, and kiwi fruit, and none significantly lowered uric acid levels, supporting a specific anti-gout effect of cherries.

There are some new gout drugs out now, costing up to $2,000 per dose and carry a "risk of toxicity that may be avoided by using nonpharmacologic treatments or prevention in the first place." Given the potential harms and high costs, attention ought to be directed to dietary modification, reducing alcohol and meat intake, particularly sardines and organ meats. "If life serves up a bowl of cherries (consumed on a regular basis), the risk of a recurrent gout attack may be meaningfully reduced."

More about the inflammation fighting effects of sweet cherries in my video Anti-inflammatory Life is a Bowl of Cherries.

I've previously mentioned gout and controlling uric acid levels in my videos:

Other foods that may help tamp down inflammation:

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven't yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live year-in-review presentations Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death, More Than an Apple a Day, From Table to Able, and Food as Medicine.

Image Credit: Valdemar Fishmen / Flickr

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